Bringing Back LCBO Alcohol?

I like the LCBO. It’s not without its flaws, but living in Montreal has really made me appreciate the LCBO’s attitude toward beer. Quebec is 99% devoid of any non-Quebecois craft beer. For 360 days per year the beer culture is isolated, the 5-day Mondial de la Biere festival being the one and only time local drinkers can expand their horizons.

Having said that, a recent suggestion that the LCBO should resume distilling their own spirits, a practice that ended in 1996, strikes me as laughable. Folded into an article filled with Orwellian language and a curious amount of righteous indignation, the suggestion seems to be at odds with the writer’s poor opinion of the LCBO, described as “our humble and benevolent alcohol overlords”.

If you really hate the LCBO so much why would you want them distilling their own spirits? It seems to me that liquor control and liquor production are best kept separate. LCBO producing their own beverages would cause the same conflict of interest that I have vocally decried about the Beer Store.

If you think Ontario’s alcohol retail is bad now, just imagine if the LCBO were operated like the Beer Store. Since they discontinued their line of spirits almost 20 years ago, the LCBO has only gotten better at serving the discening drinker. The one thing they do best, their selection, is the one thing that LCBO alcohol would put into jeopardy.

Categories: Politics | Leave a comment

Today in Beer Laws: No Contract Brewers at Beer Festivals

For a variety of reasons, brewers rarely participate in political discussions, and I respect the attitude of just getting on with making (hopefully) good beer. But Left Field Brewery, which opened last year in Toronto, has piped up to call everyone’s attention to another absurd piece of legislation with is stiffling the growth potential of small start-up craft brewers.

Left Field Brewery: Why we won’t be serving beer at festivals this summer

It’s a good time too. The Beer Store debate is as heated as ever and the amount of people who are going to pay attention to beer politics in Ontario is probably at an all-time high. And this latest tidbit is news to me:

It’s recently been brought to our attention by the AGCO that as a contract brewer, we’re only allowed to sell beer to three parties; The LCBO, The Beer Store and Licensed bars & restaurants. That list specifically excludes Special Occasion Permit (SOP) holders … including beer festival organizers.” – Mark & Mandie of Left Field Brewery.

The irony is that even Left Field Brewery is an SOP holder, since they’re co-hosting the dim sum festival YumCha! this weekend – meaning that they can’t serve their own beers at their own festival.

SOP holders would also cover any markets and private events on top of major beer festivals like Cask Days, which in this market of near-monopolistic beer sales are one of few ways that new breweries can get their beer into the hands of potential customers.

“Events and festivals are the single best way for us to sample our beers with the public and are one of our few opportunities to interact directly with beer drinkers.”

So what is this all about? Left Field Brewery is (for the time being) a contract brewer, which means they make their beer at somebody else’s brewery. This is actually pretty common. When I volunteered with a brewing company in Melbourne, Australia, there were at least four breweries that worked out of the same facility. It’s a reality and it’s a necessity in the craft beer world.

The cost of opening a brewery is somewhere in the $1 million area. That’s a big investment to make before you can even test out your first product. That’s why most small breweries start their lives either as contract brewers – since only the largest of brewers actually keep their brewhouse at capacity 7 days a week – or as nanobreweries like Motor Craft Ales.

For some reason it seems there’s a stigma against contract brewing. Left Field’s beer is “brewed at licensed breweries, has been lab tested by the LCBO and is consumed safely at over 60 bars and restaurants every day,” why should they be treated any differently than other brewers?

The law only serves to hurt the smallest of Ontario’s brewing companies, which seems to be a trait shared by most of Ontario’s beer laws.

Categories: Politics | 1 Comment

Follow-Up: Long Live the Beer Store

I have this sinking feeling that the March issue of my beer column in The Windsor Independent is going to be the most widely-read thing I’ve ever done. That being likely, I want to clarify something: The Beer Store is not the villain of the piece.

Even in the short amount of time since my article made the rounds, it has become increasingly obvious that the Beer Store is a heartless, fear-mongering enterprise that will stop at nothing to maintain its monopoly on private alcohol sales in Ontario. Case in point, the new Beer Store-managed Twitter feed “Ontario Beer Facts” (@ONBeerFacts), where they play fast and loose with the definition of “Facts”.

2014415-beer-store-adWorse yet is their 80s PSA-inspired TV ad in which they suggest that convenience store clerks are evil, pedophilic incompetents.

This contrasts with my experience in Vancouver last week at the (privately owned) Brewery Creek Liquor Store. I asked a staff member which beers were must-trys for somebody only in town for a couple days and he basically gave me a crash-course in BC beer. He was passionate, articulate, and really knew his shit.

Would you get that kind of treatment from a Beer Store clerk? No chance. That kind of behaviour could get them fired – no joke! Beer Store employees are prohibited from recommending anything, probably because the owners, Molson and Labatt, know that no educated beer drinker would ever recommend their products in good faith.

Keep reading…

Categories: Politics | 3 Comments

Beer Culture Shock: Quebec and Ontario

7688318264_d1b2ccdc8f_bI cringed as she took a hard right from Notre-Dame onto the 720, curving back left and down into the tunnel, jolting me about in the passenger seat. Her driving was fast, reckless and aggressive – she was very Quebecois.

As she drove me home to the northeastern corner of the Plateau, we talked about traditional music. She, a fiddler in the Acadian style, and I, a mandolinist in the Celtic style, were coming from a rehearsal with the now-defunct Custom Outfit in St. Henri, which for all intents and purposes was the opposite corner of the city as I then knew it.

“You should really go to the session on Tuesdays at Vices et Versa,” she was saying, “I think you’d love it. A lot of Irish tunes.” I had never heard of it. It was located further north on St. Laurent than my knowledge of the city yet extended. Later, when I moved into my sixth apartment in Montreal, each one further north than the previous as I was washed out by the tide of gentrification, Vices et Versa became my local.

I couldn’t believe it took me so long to find this place. 30+ beers on tap (and the occasional cask) all of them local and for the most part among the best of the best of Quebecois beers. Knowledgeable staff. Irish music on Tuesdays and good music most other days. Good food, good terrace, good crowd. Great bar.

“London Ruby Mild,” I ordered. The name itself caught my eye. Montreal is flooded with shit red ales, and it’s hard to find a “mild” anywhere, but as a fan of good reds and English-style beers, which are generally neglected by Quebecois breweries, I decided to take a chance. The beer, from Brasseur de Montreal, which I wasn’t familiar with, was a really full-bodied sessionable red ale, with a dominant toasty character.

A_x2TznCMAE2o1S.jpg largeA few days later, I bought a bottle of it from Paradis de la Biere and took it home, putting on a record while it chilled in the fridge and then pouring it into a tasting glass. I knew something was wrong when I smelled it. It smelled like unfermented wort, and it tasted even worse.

I told this to Mike, one of the staff, the next time I saw him at Vices et Versa. “You know,” he said, “The same thing happened to me with another beer. Have you had MacTavish?” He was referring to MacTavish in Memoriam from Le Trou du Diable, a pale ale which I had recently tried and enjoyed. “We had it here and I thought it was great, so I picked up a bottle on the way home from work and it tasted like shit. I mean that literally; it actually tasted like shit.”

In my case the fault was with the shop where I bought the beer. It’s too hot in there and they carry something around 200 beers; who knows how long it had sat on the shelf? In Mike’s case, the brewery was to blame. They shipped an obviously infected beer.

But even if stuff like this wasn’t as common, you still can’t really walk into a beer store in Quebec and pick up something at random. Most of it is shit. This may come as a surprise to anybody outside of Quebec, producers of world famous beers from Dieu du Ciel, McAuslan, Unibroue, etc. These breweries, among others, can easily out-brew most of Ontario’s top contenders. So what is it that makes these two neighbouring beer cultures so different?

Keep reading…

Categories: Generalizations about Beer Culture | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Bathysphere Breakfast Beer

This is my fourth time attempting a breakfast stout. The first was one of my favourites of the beers I’ve brewed (though my standards may have been lower back then). At the time, I thought it was an original idea. Being from Ontario and living in Montreal at the time, I’d never seen the like, since we don’t get Founders in Canada and F&M Brewery hadn’t yet released their Oatmeal Coffee Stout.

But, inspired by St. Ambroise Oatmeal Stout and Mill Street Coffee Porter, I decided that I could combine the two to create a “breakfast” beer. Taking it one step further, I added a little rauchmalt to signify cigarettes, and with the idea of actually drinking it with breakfast, I made a point of keeping the alcohol content under 4%.

The beer was as delicious as it sounds. As soon as it was gone I brewed a slightly tweaked version of the same recipe, and found myself with my first infected batch. It smelled like compost, though it didn’t taste as bad as it smelled. I never poured it out – my sometimes brewing partner Joe and I eventually did drink it all, though it took about a year.

For my third attempt I again followed a similar recipe, but switched from using brewed coffee to adding coarsely-ground coffee directly to the fermenter. I let the beer sit on 100g of beans for 5 days and the beer turned out rancid. The nose smacked you in the face with intense, overbearing coffee and the flavour was extremely tannic and astringent. It’s the only time I’ve ever poured out a batch.

Clearly this old recipe was bad luck, so for this fourth attempted I started from scratch, abandoning the low-alcohol and rauchmalt ideas in favour of making a rich, full-bodied oatmeal coffee stout. The beer is fermenting away as we speak.

Now living in Melbourne, where coffee is taken very, very seriously, I will be using the coffee I drink every day, locally blended and roasted at Wide Open Road here in Brunswick. I don’t know where the name “Bathysphere” comes from, but I do appreciate that it makes for a good alliterative name for the beer:

IMG_9044 Recipe below the fold…

Categories: Homebrewing | Tags: , , , , | 3 Comments

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com. The Adventure Journal Theme.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 30 other followers